Younger onset dementia

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Younger onset dementia

£30.00

There is a common perception that dementia is related to ageing, but this is not always the case. Younger onset dementia is defined as dementia diagnosed before age 65. It can be diagnosed very early in someones 50s, 40s, or even as early as 30s. Learn about the Wellbeing model of dementia and how to support someone who has younger onset dementia to live well.

There is a common perception that dementia is related to ageing, but this is not always the case. Younger onset dementia is defined as dementia diagnosed before age 65. It can be diagnosed very early in someone’s 50s, 40s, or even as early as 30s. Learn about the Wellbeing model of dementia and how to support someone who has younger onset dementia to live well.

This course is ideal for those caring for a loved one, a care professional, or a practitioner in a supported living environment.

Learning outcomes
  • The learner will understand the different forms of dementia and some of the common signs and symptoms
  • The learner will know how to use the Wellbeing model to support people living with dementia
  • The learner will consider the experience of those living with younger onset dementia and the impact this can have on the person, and their friends and family
Advantages of this course
  • People with young onset dementia may still be working, responsible for a mortgage, have dependent children, and possibly dependent parents too. Their lives are likely to be active, with plans and hopes for the future. A diagnosis may result in a change / modification of roles within families and accepting support where once there was independence. This course will explore how to soften the impact of these changes and suggest ideas for increasing self-esteem and meaningful tasks and activities.
  • This course will explain a couple of methods for preserving a strong sense of identity the TOP 5 strategy and Life story books
  • Autonomy as it relates to supporting someone living with dementia can seem a challenging goal. This course will explore how to encourage autonomy and reduce the risks of learned helplessness.
  • Although dementia is a progressive condition, its the responsibility of caregivers to make sure every day counts. Upon completion of this course, learners will know how to facilitate joyful moments, live in the moment, and embrace opportunities for spontaneity and fun
  • Website and video resources are used to explore the dementia journey in more detail. There is also suggested extra reading that gives both practical information and links to websites to expand knowledge